Introduction to the science of hermeneutics; the various literary forms in the Bible, use of OT in NT, typology, the various methods and tools of exegesis and exposition. Alleged contradictions in Scripture and the resolutions of these putative contradictions proposed by orthodox, biblical interpreters; relevant interpretation techniques and their significance for the broader enterprise of biblical exegesis.

This course is an overview of the theological areas of prolegomena, revelation, theology proper, anthropology, and Christology.

This course is an overview of the theological areas of prolegomena, revelation, theology proper, anthropology, and Christology.

Man as created (origin, nature, and state); his fall; sin and its effects; the redemptive work of Christ, application of work of Christ by the Holy Spirit in grace; predestination, election, calling, regeneration, repentance, faith, justification, adoption, union with Christ, sanctification, perseverance.
This course is designed to cover the important doctrines dealing with the church—its character, make-up, officers, duties, and sacraments—and with the last days, including what is called personal eschatology (what happens at death and beyond) and general eschatology (what will transpire at the end of this age). On many of these doctrines all orthodox Christians agree, while with others there is widespread controversy. The class will seek to distinguish not only the biblical position in each area of doctrine, but also the degree of certainty and primacy the Scriptures give to each doctrine.
This course introduces students to the major movements and thinkers, theologians and philosophers in the Christian tradition since the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, together with an examination of their philosophical backgrounds. Part I: Barth through Tillich. Part II: Vatican II to postmoderm theologies.
This course introduces students to the major movements and thinkers, theologians and philosophers in the Christian tradition since the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, together with an examination of their philosophical backgrounds. Part I: Barth through Tillich. Part II: Vatican II to postmoderm theologies.